Newswire (Published: Thursday, January 23, 2020, Received: Thursday, January 23, 2020, 3:31:56 PM CST)

Word Count: 969

2020 JAN 23 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at CDC & FDA Daily -- Clovis Oncology, Inc. (NASDAQ: CLVS) announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted the company’s supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for Rubraca® (rucaparib) and granted priority review status to the application with a Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) date of May 15, 2020. Clovis submitted the sNDA submission for rucaparib as a monotherapy treatment of adult patients with BRCA1/2-mutant recurrent, metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer in November 2019.

“Recently presented data suggests that Rubraca may play a meaningful role in the treatment of patients with BRCA1/2-mutant recurrent, metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer, and this filing represents an important milestone for Clovis as it brings us one step closer to potentially making this valuable therapy available,” said Patrick J. Mahaffy, President and CEO of Clovis Oncology. “We are encouraged by the FDA’s decision to grant priority review to the Rubraca application, which focuses on eligible patients with advanced prostate cancer, for whom new treatment options are very much needed.”

A priority review designation is granted to proposed medicines that the FDA has determined have the potential, if approved, to offer a significant improvement in the safety or effectiveness of the treatment, prevention or diagnosis of a serious condition. Priority designation shortens the review period from the standard 10 months to six months. About Prostate Cancer The American Cancer Society estimated that more than 175,000 men in the United States would be diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2019, and the GLOBOCAN Cancer Fact Sheets estimated that approximately 450,000 men in Europe were diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2018. Castrate-resistant prostate cancer has a high likelihood of developing metastases. Metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer, or mCRPC, is an incurable disease, usually associated with poor prognosis. Approximately 43,000 men in the U.S. are expected to be diagnosed with mCRPC in 2020. According to the American Cancer Society, the five-year survival rate for mCRPC is approximately 30 percent. Up to 12 percent of patients with mCRPC harbor a deleterious germline and/or somatic mutation in the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. These molecular markers may be used to select patients for treatment with a PARP inhibitor. About Rubraca (rucaparib) Rucaparib is an oral, small molecule inhibitor of PARP1, PARP2 and PARP3 being developed in multiple tumor types, including ovarian and metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancers, as monotherapy, and in combination with other anti-cancer agents. Exploratory studies in other tumor types are also underway. Rubraca U.S. FDA Approved Indications Rubraca is indicated as monotherapy for the maintenance treatment of adult patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer who are in a complete or partial response to platinum-based chemotherapy.

Rubraca is indicated as monotherapy for the treatment of adult patients with deleterious BRCA mutations (germline and/or somatic) associated epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer who have been treated with two or more chemotherapies and selected for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for Rubraca. Select Important Safety Information Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS)/Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) occur uncommonly in patients treated with Rubraca, and are potentially fatal adverse reactions. In approximately 1100 treated patients, MDS/AML occurred in 12 patients (1.1%), including those in long-term follow-up. Of these, five occurred during treatment or during the 28-day safety follow-up (0.5%). The duration of Rubraca treatment prior to the diagnosis of MDS/AML ranged from 1 month to approximately 28 months. The cases were typical of secondary MDS/cancer therapy-related AML; in all cases, patients had received previous platinum-containing regimens and/or other DNA-damaging agents. Do not start Rubraca until patients have recovered from hematological toxicity caused by previous chemotherapy (= Grade 1).

Monitor complete blood counts for cytopenia at baseline and monthly thereafter for clinically significant changes during treatment. For prolonged hematological toxicities (> 4 weeks), interrupt Rubraca or reduce dose (see Dosage and Administration [2.2] in full Prescribing Information) and monitor blood counts weekly until recovery. If the levels have not recovered to Grade 1 or less after 4 weeks, or if MDS/AML is suspected, refer the patient to a hematologist for further investigations, including bone marrow analysis and blood sample cytogenetic analysis. If MDS/AML is confirmed, discontinue Rubraca.

Based on its mechanism of action and findings from animal studies, Rubraca can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Apprise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment and for 6 months following the last dose of Rubraca.

Most common adverse reactions in ARIEL3 (= 20%; Grade 1-4) were nausea (76%), fatigue/asthenia (73%), abdominal pain/distention (46%), rash (43%), dysgeusia (40%), anemia (39%), AST/ALT elevation (38%), constipation (37%), vomiting (37%), diarrhea (32%), thrombocytopenia (29%), nasopharyngitis/upper respiratory tract infection (29%), stomatitis (28%), decreased appetite (23%) and neutropenia (20%).

Most common laboratory abnormalities in ARIEL3 (= 25%; Grade 1-4) were increase in creatinine (98%), decrease in hemoglobin (88%), increase in cholesterol (84%), increase in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (73%), increase in aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (61%), decrease in platelets (44%), decrease in leukocytes (44%), decrease in neutrophils (38%), increase in alkaline phosphatase (37%) and decrease in lymphocytes (29%).

Most common adverse reactions in Study 10 and ARIEL2 (= 20%; Grade 1-4) were nausea (77%), asthenia/fatigue (77%), vomiting (46%), anemia (44%), constipation (40%), dysgeusia (39%), decreased appetite (39%), diarrhea (34%), abdominal pain (32%), dyspnea (21%) and thrombocytopenia (21%).

Most common laboratory abnormalities in Study 10 and ARIEL2 (= 35%; Grade 1-4) were increase in creatinine (92%), increase in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (74%), increase in aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (73%), decrease in hemoglobin (67%), decrease in lymphocytes (45%), increase in cholesterol (40%), decrease in platelets (39%) and decrease in absolute neutrophil count (35%).

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